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Hearing loss + cognitive decline

Hearing loss + cognitive decline

 

Hearing loss and cognitive decline is an important fact. Hearing loss can have a huge impact on your cognitive wellbeing.  Wikipedia says ”Cognitive functions encompass reasoning, memory , attention, and language and lead directly to the attainment of information and, thus, knowledge”.  So hearing is a very important sense we need to keep on top of for a better quality of life.

The Honiton hearing centre can help with keeping your hearing at tip top levels. We use the latests hearing test tech and dispense the latests digital hearing aids on the market.

If you are serious about keeping your mental health in check please make an appointment and let us help with any hearing issues you may have. it could be a simple as clearing your ear wax!

If you do suffer from ear wax we offer micro-suction and the traditional ear syringing technique. Please click here to see how this works.

 

Bellow is a snippet of information from the latest British Irish hearing instrument manufacturers association meeting discussing cognitive decline.

 

Panel on Issues Facing Hearing Industry

BIHIMA, British and Irish Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association
Over half (55%) of audiologists do not believe their patients are aware of the link between hearing loss and cognitive decline, according to the results of an audiologist research panel, conducted by the British Irish Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (BIHIMA), the Association announced.
BIHIMA questioned approximately 70 audiologists across the private sector and NHS, in April 2019, on issues facing the hearing industry today. Many audiologists on the panel highlighted the increasing need for their consultations to include an education piece on the growing body of research connecting hearing loss and cognitive decline.
BIHIMA Chairman, Paul Surridge, believes the industry has a duty to empower audiologists to deliver this crucial education work: “It is essential that we work together as an industry to educate patients about the link between hearing loss and cognitive decline. If, as our research suggests, this education work tends to lie with audiologists, then we must do all we can to help and support them, as we did in our recent Dementia Round Table at the RCGP.”
The panel was also questioned on the technology trends of the future. They highlighted the following key trends for hearing tech (in order of priority): 1) Signal processing, 2) Smart technology and mobile apps, 3) Remote tuning of hearing devices, 4) Biometric monitoring of brain/heart function, and 5) Rechargeable hearing aids. Other trends mentioned include Artificial intelligence, OTC hearing aids, wireless accessories, and wearables.
The audiologists concluded that the biggest innovation challenges the industry faces in the future are: complexity leading to consumer inability to utilize the technology, battery life, lack of real-world testing, small scale, design appeal, speech recognition in noise, and connectivity.
The top reasons patients seek hearing aids from an audiologist were listed as: Not able to hear people talk, peer or family pressure, social isolation, work issues, unable to hear on the telephone, tinnitus, and hearing speech in noise.
Finally, the panel was asked how frequently they think people should get their hearing checked. Audiologists working in the private sector reported annual visits, whereas NHS audiologists said that, on average, their patients come for a hearing test every 3 years.
Surridge concludes: “It is a concern that private and NHS opinions on the frequency of hearing checks differ, as BIHIMA’s view is that hearing tests for the over 55s should take place once a year and be considered part of peoples’ regular health check routine, like dental and eye care. We intend to seek further feedback on this issue as we believe there needs to be an industry standard that all agree to, so we invite you to share your thoughts with us via our Facebookand Twitter channels.”
BIHIMA brought together this panel of experts in audiology to consult on industry matters. Its aim is to ensure the technology developed by its members is influenced by the knowledge and expertise of audiologists, and so that BIHIMA’s contribution to public discussions around hearing loss remains well informed.
About the Research:
  • The BIHIMA Audiologist Research Panel is made up of NHS and private audiologists, actively practicing in the UK
  • 71 respondents made up the May 19 panel—62% private v 38% NHS
  • Respondents were asked 10 questions via an anonymous online survey
  • Date: February-April 2019

Source: BIHIMA

Bridport ear wax removal

Bridport ear wax removal

 

Bridport earwax removal by the Honiton hearing centre.

 

Ear wax removal in the Bridport area is difficult as now the local GP’s have stopped the procedure as it is now not covered by the NHS.  Colin Eaton the lead audiologist at the Honiton Hearing centre is available to step in and take some of the slack in the area.  Specialising in ear wax removal using the Microsuction technique or the traditional water irrigation.  Apart from ear wax removal the Honiton hearing centre also conduct hearing tests and the servicing of hearing aids. Hearing aid batteries are on sale at the centre and the dispensing of hearing aids by the leading hearing aid brands.

 

Honiton hearing news:

BIHIMA Releases Q3 Results on UK Hearing Aid Sales

Original story by The Hearing review

BIHIMA_LOGO_RGB_150dpi

The British and Irish Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (BIHIMA) announced its release of the Q3 results of its members, providing a picture of current trends and developments within the UK and Irish hearing care markets.

According to BIHIMA’s announcement, the “most significant” development is the continued growth in the number of units distributed through the private market in the UK: the number of unit sales increased by 2,756 units (3.5%) from the previous year and by 2,638 (3.3%) from Q2 2018. YTD (year-to-date) unit sales were also up 3.8% from 2017.

Bridport ear wax removal

Meanwhile, the BIHIMA reports that the NHS side of the market slowed down in the same period: unit sales were flat compared to Q3 2017 and decreased by 7445 (2.2%) from Q2 2018.  YTD units were down 1.6% from 2017.

BIHIMA also tracks the trends in the types of technology being selected by patients in the private sector. In the private sector, the RITE/RIC (receiver-in-the-ear technology) continues to grow in popularity and now represents 69.4% of all sales, up 1.7% from Q3 2017.

“We are seeing solid growth in the private hearing care sector which is in line with expectations based on our aging population and also points to evolving public awareness of the hearing technology produced by our manufacturers which can have transformative results,” said the BIHIMA chairman, Paul Surridge.

Bridport hearing aids

In its role as the voice for the hearing technology industry, BIHIMA regularly monitors the market and releases the results of its members every quarter.

To keep up to date with the latest market information, download the results here: https://www.bihima.com/resources/statistics/.

Source: BIHIMA