2020 Oticon hearing aids available in Devon

2020 Oticon hearing aids available in Devon

2020 Oticon hearing aids available in Devon at the Honiton hearing centre near Exeter

 

Oticon hearing products are at the vanguard of hearing technology. Their hearing aids really are at the cutting edge of what is available today that can help anyone with hearing loss. We at the Honiton Hearing Centre are proud stockist of Oticon hearing aids and would be very happy to advise which type & model would suit your hearing loss. We also stock and procure the top world wide manufacturers of hearing aids and hearing products. We are not tied to sell one main manufacturers hearing aids.

As an independent hearing company and not tied to any manufacturer, we will only advise what hearing aid is best suited to your hearing loss and budget. Be assured we only have your hearing in mind, and not a target to sell so many hearing aids per month.

If you feel you may need a hearing test we offer appointments throughout the day and week. Please call or use our booking system which you will find here. 

 

Honiton Hearing News

 

Oticon Xceed and RemoteCare Named as Honourees in CES 2020 Innovation Awards

Oticon Xceed with ON app, Honiton hearing centre near Exeter

Oticon announced that the Consumer Electronics Association (CES) has named Oticon Xceed and Oticon RemoteCare as honourees in the CES 2020 Innovation Awards. The international awards program annually selects the best of the best in consumer electronics. Oticon Xceed, said to be “the world’s most powerful hearing aid,” earned honours in the Health & Wellness category.  Oticon RemoteCare, a new e-health solution that will help enable hearing care professionals to provide aftercare service to their patients (to be released in 2020), was honoured in the Tech for a Better World category.

This is the fourth consecutive year that Oticon has been recognised by this international awards program.  The two newest awards bring to 10 the number of times Oticon has received CES Innovation Awards, including three top-ranked Best of Innovation category wins.

“We are extremely proud to have Oticon Xceed and Oticon RemoteCare honoured by the Consumer Electronics Association,” said Oticon President Gary Rosenblum. “Our ability to consistently stand out in a competition that includes some of the world’s most cutting-edge consumer technology products and services underscores Oticon’s commitment to develop hearing technology that makes a real difference in people’s lives.”

Exeter hearing centre 

Oticon Xceed features a new approach to hearing care for individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss that is said to help deliver better speech clarity and better short-term recall while reducing the listening effort this patient population struggles with in most situations every day.

Honiton hearing centre near Exeter, Devon

Oticon Xceed

According to Oticon, Xceed is the “first super- and ultra-power hearing aid with OpenSound Navigator and OpenSound Optimiser, BrainHearing technologies that support more access to speech.” The technology in Xceed reportedly “empowers hearing care professionals to deliver industry-leading optimal output and gain—146dB SPL and 87 dB full on gain—without the high risk of feedback.”

Convenient Follow-up Care Benefits Practitioner and Patient

When launched in 2020, Oticon says its RemoteCare will “facilitate easier access to the personalised care that qualified hearing care practitioners provide and that hearing aid wearers require,” helping to allow hearing care professionals to provide optimal support for their patients at a mutually convenient time. RemoteCare will also help provide hearing care professionals and patients with easy access to follow-up appointments, especially convenient during the first days and weeks with new hearing aids. The Oticon RemoteCare App also helps enables data communication between the users’ hearing aids and the hearing care professional via a stable Internet connection, the company says. Hearing care practitioners can help make necessary adjustments in real time—just as if the patient was in the clinic—and receive immediate feedback.

Devon hearing centre

“By providing a global showcase for our newest hearing technology, prestigious awards like the CES Innovation Awards help us to show the world the wide-ranging possibilities of modern hearing technology to improve not only hearing, but quality of life,” said Rosenblum.

To learn more about Oticon Xceed, visit: www.oticon.com/xceed.  For more information on the comprehensive Oticon product portfolio, visit: www.oticon.com.

Source: Oticon

Images: Oticon

I

Hearing for East Devon

Hearing for East Devon

It has been estimated that only 1-in-5 people who need a hearing aid wears one.

Audiologist Colin Eaton of  The Honiton hearing centre in Honiton Devon, thinks that is unfortunate.

He has been fitting people with hearing aids for more than 20 years and says today’s technology has something for just about everyone’s hearing loss.

Hearing centre South Devon

He says hearing aids now are smaller and can be regulated more discreetly and that the computer chips inside them recognise different sound types and can be programmed to adjust volume accordingly as well as to meet an individual’s specific hearing needs.

Blue Tooth technology allows for direct streaming of sound into the ears from smartphones and other devices and, he adds, always improving applications from manufacturers enable those phones to act as remote controls in adjusting volume and sound in a variety of settings as well.

“Sometimes people have the idea that there is nothing that can be done for them. They might feel their hearing is not bad enough or they might feel like their hearing is so bad that nothing can be done,”

Ear wax removal Devon

“Sometimes I find they were told 40 years ago, hearing aids won’t help you. If there is anyone who heard that, that is not true today. The technology can fit a wide range of hearing losses from mild to profound and, if it gets to the point where hearing aids don’t do the trick, we refer people for a cochlear implant and they can have that and that technology continues to get better, too.”

Colin Eaton is available for hearing consultations and ear wax removal. Please call reception and speak with Sam.

Hearing centre Devon

Hearing centre Devon

 

 

If you are in need of a hearing centre in the Devon area we are located in Honiton very close to Exeter. we specialise in ear wax removal (see our ear syringing video here), and we are experts in hearing aids, supplying and fitting the very latest 2020 versions of digital hearing instruments.  We are a local independent company that are very competitive on price for hearing aids.  Ear wax removal we use Micro-suction or the traditional water irrigation method, you can watch both here and here.

Ear syringing Devon

 

Honiton Hearing News :

 

Smartphone App to Detect Ear Infections Developed at University of Washington

Ear infections are the most common reason that parents bring their children to a paediatrician, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

This condition occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear behind the eardrum and is infected. This buildup is also common in another condition called otitis media with effusion. Any kind of fluid buildup can be painful and make it hard for children to hear, which can be especially detrimental when they are learning to talk.

Both conditions are hard to diagnose because they have vague symptoms: Sometimes children tug on their ears or have fevers, and sometimes there are no symptoms. In addition, young children may not be able to describe where they hurt.

Dr. Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital, uses the app to check his daughter’s ear.Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Dr Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital, uses the app to check his daughter’s ear. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Now researchers at the University of Washington have created a new smartphone app that can detect fluid behind the eardrum by simply using a piece of paper and a smartphone’s microphone and speaker. An article detailing the app’s functionality is posted on the University of Washington’s media portal, UW NewsThe smartphone makes a series of soft audible chirps into the ear through a small paper funnel and, depending on the way the chirps are reflected back to the phone, the app determines the likelihood of fluid present with a probability of detection of 85%. This is on par with current methods used by specialists to detect fluid in the middle ear, which involve specialised tools that use acoustics or a puff of air.

The team published its results May 15 in Science Translational Medicine.

Sidmouth hearing aids

“Designing an accurate screening tool on something as ubiquitous as a smartphone can be game changing for parents as well as health care providers in resource-limited regions,” said co-author Shyam Gollakota, an associate professor in the UW’s Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. “A key advantage of our technology is that it does not require any additional hardware other than a piece of paper and a software app running on the smartphone.”

Once diagnosed, ear infections can be easily treated with observation or antibiotics, and persistent fluid can be monitored or drained by a doctor to relieve symptoms of pain or hearing loss. A quick screening at home could help parents decide whether or not they need to take their child to the doctor.

This app works by sending sounds into the ear and measuring how those sound waves change as they bounce off the eardrum. The team’s system involves a smartphone and a regular piece of paper that the doctor or parent can cut and fold into a funnel. The funnel rests on the outer ear and guides sound waves in and out of the ear canal. When the phone plays a continuous 150 millisecond sound—which sounds like a bird chirping—through the funnel, the sound waves bounce off the eardrum, travel back through the funnel, and are picked up by the smartphone’s microphone along with the original chirps. Depending on whether there’s fluid inside, the reflected sound waves interfere with the original chirp sound waves differently.

“It’s like tapping a wine glass,” said co-first author Justin Chan, a doctoral student in the Allen School. “Depending on how much liquid is in it, you get different sounds. Using machine learning on these sounds, we can detect the presence of liquid.”

When there is no fluid behind the eardrum, the eardrum vibrates and sends a variety of sound waves back. These sound waves mildly interfere with the original chirp, creating a broad, shallow dip in the overall signal. But when the eardrum has fluid behind it, it doesn’t vibrate as well and reflects the original sound waves back. They interfere more strongly with the original chirp and create a narrow, deep dip in the signal.

Exeter ear syringing

To train an algorithm that detects changes in the signal and classifies ears as having fluid or not, the team tested 53 children between the ages of 18 months and 17 years at Seattle Children’s Hospital. About half of the children were scheduled to undergo surgery for ear tube placement, a common surgery for patients with chronic or recurrent incidents of ear fluid. The other half were scheduled to undergo a different surgery unrelated to ears, such as a tonsillectomy.

“What is really unique about this study is that we used the gold standard for diagnosing ear infections,” said co-first author Dr Sharat Raju, a surgical resident in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine. “When we put in ear tubes, we make an incision into the eardrum and drain any fluid present. That’s the best way to tell if there is fluid behind the eardrum. So these surgeries created the ideal setting for this study.”

After parents provided informed consent, the team recorded the chirps and their resulting sound waves from the patients’ ears immediately before surgery. Many of the children responded to the chirps by smiling or laughing.

The system uses a regular piece of paper cut and folded into a funnel to guide sound waves in and out of the ear canal. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

The system uses a regular piece of paper cut and folded into a funnel to guide sound waves in and out of the ear canal. Photo credit: Dennis Wise/University of Washington

Among the children getting their ear tubes placed, surgery revealed that 24 ears had fluid behind the eardrum, while 24 ears did not. For children scheduled for other surgeries, two ears had bulging eardrums characteristic of an ear infection, while the other 48 ears were fine. The algorithm correctly identified the likelihood of fluid 85% of the time, which is comparable to current methods that specialised doctors use to diagnose fluid in the middle ear.

Tiverton ear wax removal

Then the team tested the algorithm on 15 ears belonging to younger children between 9 and 18 months of age. It correctly classified all five ears that were positive for fluid and nine out of the 10 ears, or 90%, that did not have fluid.

“Even though our algorithm was trained on older kids, it still works well for this age group,” said co-author Dr Randall Bly, an assistant professor of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the UW School of Medicine who practices at Seattle Children’s Hospital. “This is critical because this group has a high incidence of ear infections.”

Because the researchers want parents to be able to use this technology at home, the team trained parents how to use the system on their own children. Parents and doctors folded paper funnels, tested 25 ears, and compared the results. Both parents and doctors successfully detected the six fluid-filled ears. Parents and doctors also agreed on 18 out of the 19 ears with no fluid. In addition, the sound wave curves generated by both parent and doctor tests looked similar.

“The ability to know how often and for how long fluid has been present could help us make the best management decisions with patients and parents,” Bly said. “It also could help primary care providers know when to refer to a specialist.”

See a related story from NPR.

The team also tested the algorithm on a variety of smartphones and used different types of paper to make the funnel. The results were consistent regardless of phone or paper type. The researchers plan on commercialising this technology through a spin-out company, Edus Health, and then making the app available to the public.

“Fluid behind the eardrum is so common in children that there’s a direct need for an accessible and accurate screening tool that can be used at home or in clinical settings,” Raju said. “If parents could use a piece of hardware they already have to do a quick physical exam that can say ‘Your child most likely doesn’t have ear fluid’ or ‘Your child likely has ear fluid, you should make an appointment with your pediatrician,’ that would be huge.”

Rajalakshmi Nandakumar, a doctoral student in the Allen School, is also a co-author on this paper. This research was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the NIH, and the Seattle Children’s Sie-Hatsukami Research Endowment.

Original Paper: Chan J, Raju S, Nandakumar R, Bly R, Gollakota S. Detecting middle ear fluid using smartphones. Science Translational Medicine. 2019;11(492):eaav1102.

 

Tinnitus and hearing loss Devon

Tinnitus and hearing loss Devon

Bellow is an informative new paper released in September 2019. If you suffer from hearing loss and Tinnitus it could be something to look at.

 

Does Tinnitus Get Worse as Hearing Loss Increases in Severity?

Our results suggest that tinnitus will likely get louder, but not by very much,” write Hashir Aazh, PhD, and Richard Salvi, PhD, in their recent study published in JAAA which shows only a weak association between tinnitus loudness and puretone average (PTA) thresholds.

When patients ask an audiologist or hearing care professional if their tinnitus (ringing in the ears) is going to get worse as their hearing loss progresses, what answer do they usually receive? Most hearing care professionals will reassure the patient by telling them that, although it’s possible for this to occur, it’s generally not a problem they’ve observed in their practice. Now there is some clinical science to back up this answer.

paper published in the September 2019 edition of the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology by Hashir Aazh, PhD, and Richard Salvi, PhD, shows that the relationship between tinnitus loudness and puretone average (PTA) thresholds are only weakly associated.

Tinnitus and hearing loss Devon

Hashir Aazh, PhD

The researchers looked at a retrospective cross-sectional sample of 445 consecutive patients at the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Therapy Specialist Clinic in Guildford, UK, who had been surveyed with audiological and self-report questionnaires. The patients were seen from 2013 to 2016 and had an average age of 54.4 years, with an even split between males (49%) and females (51%). Questionnaires included the visual analog scale (VAS), tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), hyperacusis questionnaire (HQ), hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS), and the insomnia severity index (ISI).

Richard Salvi, PhD

In the sample, a total of 12% of patients had no tinnitus handicap on the THI, while 32% had mild, 24% had moderate, and 33% had severe tinnitus handicap. Based on PTA for the better ear, 66% of the tinnitus patients had no hearing loss, 29% had mild hearing loss, and 5% had moderate hearing loss. For the worse ear, 49% of patients had no hearing loss, 36% had a mild loss, 13% had a moderate loss, while 0.6% and 0.9% had a severe and profound hearing loss respectively.

When analyzing tinnitus severity and hearing loss via a regression model, a .036 increase in loudness per 1-dB increase in PTA threshold was found at a significant level of confidence. “This relationship is very weak and the linear model explains only 4% of the variance in tinnitus loudness, suggesting that factors other than severity of hearing loss may contribute to self-report tinnitus loudness,” write the authors.

However, correlations were noted between tinnitus severity and the other variables measured in the questionnaires. These included:

  • Based on the HQ score, 32% experienced hyperacusis (unusual sensitivity/aversion to louder sounds) with 4% being diagnosed with severe hyperacusis.
  • While 31% did not have insomnia, 29.5% had mild insomnia, while 27.5% and 12% had moderate or severe insomnia respectively.
  • Tinnitus loudness was more strongly correlated with tinnitus annoyance and tinnitus life effect than PTA.

The authors hypothesise that the weak association between PTA and tinnitus severity could be explained by an increase in spontaneous activity within the central nervous system (CNS) after cochlear damage, as cited in other studies. However, the authors also note the weak correlation “may be due to the fact that threshold measures do not accurately capture some forms of cochlear pathology that may trigger tinnitus.” For example, it’s possible that some forms of tinnitus might arise from damaged inner hair cells or afferent synapses, but these types of cochlear damage are often not reflected in an audiogram (eg, cochlear synaptopathy or “hidden hearing loss”).

Drs Aazh and Salvi conclude, “Tinnitus patients often ask whether the loudness of their tinnitus will increase if their hearing gets worse. Our results suggest that tinnitus will likely get louder, but not by very much.” They note that the study was limited to information gathered in day-to-day clinics and did not include psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus loudness which might be useful in further research.

Ear wax removal Devon

Dr Aazh is head of the Tinnitus and Hyperacusis Therapy Specialist Clinic at the Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in Guildford, UK. Dr Salvi is the co-founder and director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness at the University of Buffalo. —KES

Original paper: Aazh H, Salvi R. The relationship between severity of hearing loss and subjective tinnitus loudness among patients seen in a specialist tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy clinic in UK. J Am Acad Audiol. 2019;30(8)[Sept]:712-719.

About the author: Karl E. Strom is editor of The Hearing Review and has been reporting on hearing healthcare issues for over 25 years.

 

Hearing care for Devon

Hearing care for Devon

 

Devon hearing care for everything to do with hearing and wax removal at the Honiton hearing centre near Exeter. Specialist ear wax removal and suppliers o the worlds most advanced hearing aids, Honiton hearing are your local, family owned and run hearing experts for the Devon area.

Devon Hearing Care

 

Ear wax removal or ”Ear Syringing’. Colin Eaton explains all in this educational short video.

To book your ear wax removal using Microsuction or the traditional water irrigation method click here 

 

 

Honiton Hearing News:

 

Study Identifies 44 Genes Linked to Age-related Hearing Loss

Published on 

A new study published in The American Journal of Human Genetics has identified 44 genes linked to age-related hearing loss, giving a much clearer understanding of how the condition develops and potential treatments, according to a press release on the King’s College London website.

In the study, researchers from King’s and University College London (UCL) analyzed the genetic data from over 250,000 participants of the UK Biobank aged 40-69 years to see which genes were associated with people who had reported having or not having hearing problems on a questionnaire. Forty-four genes were identified to be linked with hearing loss.

Devon ear wax removal

By the age of 65, one-third of people are affected by some degree of hearing loss which can lead to social isolation and disability and has been identified as a risk factor for dementia.

Despite being a common impairment in the elderly, little is known about the causes of the hearing loss and the only treatment option available is hearing aids which are often not worn once prescribed. The findings of this study will allow researchers to determine how the condition develops as we age and may identify potential targets for new therapies.

“We now know that very many genes are involved in the loss of hearing as we age. This study has identified a few genes that we already know cause deafness in children, but it has also revealed lots of additional novel genes which point to new biological pathways in hearing,” said Professor Frances Williams, co-lead author.

Co-lead author Dr Sally Dawson (UCL Ear Institute) said, “Before our study, only five genes had been identified as predictors of age-related hearing loss, so our findings herald a nine-fold increase in independent genetic markers. We hope that our findings will help drive forward research into much needed new therapies for the millions of people worldwide affected by hearing loss as they age.”

The next steps in this research are to understand how each identified gene influences the auditory pathway, providing opportunities to develop new treatments.

Exeter ear wax removal

Dr Ralph Holme, executive director of research at Action on Hearing Loss, said, “These findings are incredibly significant. We believe they will speed up the discovery of treatments to slow or even halt the progressive loss of hearing as we get older, something which happens to at least 70% of over-70-year-olds. This research was funded by us thanks to the generosity of our supporters and we know from people with hearing loss that being able to hear well again would completely transform their lives. The identification of these genes linked to age-related hearing loss throws open the door to many new lines of research into treatments.”

Original Paper: Wells HRR, Freidin MB, Abidin FNZ, et al. GWAS identifies 44 independent associated genomic loci for self-reported adult hearing difficulty in UK Biobank. American Journal of Human Genetics. 2019. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.09.008

Source: Kings College London, American Journal of Human Genetics

Tiverton Ear wax removal

 

Devon ear wax removal centre

Devon ear wax removal centre

Available at the Honiton hearing centre near Exeter

 

 

Ear wax removal doesn’t have to be a chore. We are a fully accredited ear wax removal specialist centre that covers the whole of Devon and Somerset, handily located in Honiton close to Exeter.  We are a family run business and cherish that we serve our local community, also people from a far.  We use the traditional ”Ear syringing” technique, which is actually called water irrigation and isn’t anything like a carry on film. You can watch Colin Eaton talk about ear syringing here in this video. He will explain in detail what that was all about and what is now the gold standard.

Devon Microsuction

The Gold standard these days is called Microsuction or Micro-Suction depending where you read. It is basically a very very small hoover type of device that gently sucks up the ear wax in a safer manor than hitting the ear with pressured water which they did in the bad old days. Ears are very delicate, with todays techniques the risk is a lot lower.

You can watch how Micro-Suction is performed by watching this video here conducted again by Colin Eaton who is the lead audiologist here at the Honiton hearing centre.

Devon ear wax removal centre

We look forward to seeing you if you haven’t been here before, if you could please call Sam on reception or you can make an online booking by clicking here. 

 

New Signia hearing aids announced

Signia Introduces Xperience Platform with Motion Sensor Technology

A post by the Honiton hearing centre

The new Pure 312 X hearing aid: a discreet personalized hearing aid with direct streaming.

The new Pure 312 X hearing aid: a discreet personalised hearing aid with direct streaming.

Signia, a brand of WS Audiology A/S, has launched Signia Xperience, a new platform that reportedly introduces the world’s first combination of advanced acoustic sensors with a built-in motion sensor. Signia Xperience hearing aids are designed to provide a complete analysis of the wearer’s dynamic soundscape, allowing for automatic adjustments between sounds in front of and all around the wearer for a personalised listening experience.

Devon hearing Company

Many hearing aid wearers have an active lifestyle and are always on the go—yet, current hearing aids don’t always keep up relative to hearing in noise. Existing hearing aids are sometimes unable to adapt to diverse listening environments as the wearer moves around. The Signia Xperience platform, built upon YourSound technology, was developed to fill this crucial gap and respond to rapid changes in the wearer’s environment.

YourSound Technology

Patricia (Tish) Ramirez, AuD

Patricia (Tish) Ramirez, AuD

With the new YourSound technology, Signia Xperience hearing aids can identify more variables from the environment than ever before and ensure they know what is important at every moment, according to the company. They also include a built-in motion sensor to take into consideration how the wearer’s movement affects their hearing in each situation. In a conversation with The Hearing Review, Signia Vice President of Clinical Education & Professional Relations Tish Ramirez, AuD, provided information about how the system can identify soundscapes in dynamic listening situations, and then intelligently apply omni-directional, directional, and narrow-band microphone technology in addition to advanced processing algorithms to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in changing acoustic environments. For example, she described a “cocktail party” scene where a listener might wish to walk through the party and hear the “omni” environment, then stop to chat and enjoy a one-on-one conversation where narrow-band directionality might be engaged, but also benefit from detection of important noises in back (eg, a waiter asking if you need something) as the hearing aid adjusts accordingly.

East Devon hearing aids and Ear Wax Removal

In essence, the new Signia Xperience is designed to enable wearers to continuously benefit from the proper amount of frontal focus, says Dr Ramirez, while still being able to hear relevant speech from other directions, like when running in a park with friends or walking down a busy street. Although inertial sensors have been employed in other hearing aids, Dr Ramirez says this is the first time these sensors have been employed for addressing SNR, ambient modulation, own-voice features, and more, enhancing the hearing aid’s speech-in-noise performance in a wider variety of acoustic settings.

The three key features of YourSound technology are:

  • Acoustic-motion sensors for a complete analysis of each wearer’s dynamic soundscape;
  • Dynamic Soundscape Processing for natural sound and speech from any direction, in any situation—even when moving, and
  • Own Voice Processing (OVP™) for a natural sounding own voice.

YourSound technology is delivered by the powerful Signia Xperience chip. It includes 80% more transistors and 7 times the memory of the previous Signia Nx chip, while being 60% smaller. As a result, the first two hearing aids on the platform, the Pure® 312 X and the Pure® Charge&Go X, are smaller yet more powerful than their predecessors.

A New Sound and New Look for Pure 312 X

Available now, the Pure 312 X includes all the benefits of the Signia Xperience platform in a new, appealing design created in collaboration with hearing care professionals and hearing aid wearers. With long-lasting exchangeable batteries, plus an optional telecoil (available in December), this high-performing receiver-in-canal (RIC) hearing aid is said to deliver a more personal hearing experience, with a clean, ergonomic design. Pure 312 X also has Bluetooth® connectivity for effortless streaming of phone calls, music, and TV audio.

New Features for Pure Charge&Go X

Pure Charge&Go X combines all advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion rechargeability and full Bluetooth (BT) connectivity.

Pure Charge&Go X combines all advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion recharge-ability and full Bluetooth (BT) connectivity.

Exeter hearing aids

Coming in November, Pure Charge&Go X is a RIC with Bluetooth connectivity that combines the advantages of the Signia Xperience platform with lithium-ion recharge-ability. With 20% more charging capacity and 16% smaller than the previous Pure Charge&Go Nx, wearers benefit from a slim device that can support a long wear time even with streaming, says Signia.

Pure Charge&Go X features a rocker switch for easier adjustments and comes with a new inductive charger with a lid to protect the hearing aids as they charge. The charger also works as a dehumidifier and is designed to fit custom ear molds.

The new charger will be backward compatible to existing rechargeable Signia devices, and also affords a 30-minute fast-charge that can give wearers 6 hours of operation.

The Signia App: Three Apps in One

The Signia app provides hearing aid wearers with everything they need for a personalized wearing experience, including remote control, remote support, and audio streaming.

The Signia app provides hearing aid wearers with everything they need for a personalised wearing experience, including remote control, remote support, and audio streaming.

Sidmouth Hearing aids

Along with these two new products, the Signia Xperience introduces a new app. The Signia app combines the three existing Signia apps—the myHearing app for remote telecaretouchControl app (for non-BT), and myControl app(for BT aids)— into one unified environment to meet every user’s needs, including:

  • Providing wearers with direct support from a hearing care professional;
  • Remote control so the wearer can personalise their hearing experience, and
  • Easy management of streaming accessories to fully enjoy phone calls, music, and TV.

Available in S-Demos. As with the Signia Nx, the new hearing aids will also be available for hearing care professionals in models that can be demonstrated to patients on a timed-trial basis.

Additional information about the Signia Xperience platform can be found at: https://pro.signiausa.com/signia-xperience/

Best place to buy your hearing aids, Devon

Best place to buy your hearing aids, Devon

Devon hearing aid centre is based at Honiton and run by Colin and Sam Eaton.  Offering a full service including hearing tests, ear wax removal (using Micros-Suction) and the fitting of the latest digital hearing aids for the Devon area including Exeter and Sidmouth.  The Honiton hearing centre can sometimes fit in early appointments through cancellations, so always ask to see if there are any early appointments needed for Ear Wax removal.  Please mention this when you book an ear wax removal appointment.

To see how we remove ear wax please watch our video here.

Devon hearing news:

Widex Announces TV PLAY and RedDot Award Honor

Original story by The Hearing Review

Widex TV PLAY.

Widex A/S, Lynge, Denmark, the privately-owned Danish hearing aid company, has announced the launch of WIDEX TV PLAY, a high-end TV accessory and streaming solution for WIDEX EVOKE hearing aids. The sleek and versatile TV PLAY received the Red Dot Design Concept Award last Friday, September 28, for its pleasing design.

Devon hearing aids

WidexWidex has also been honored as a leader in innovation in the RedDot Design Ranking for Design Concepts. The company placed number 4 out of 15 companies in the Americas and Europe region in recognition of its pursuit of design excellence over the past 5 years, reports the company.

Shipments of TV PLAY will start in November.

A valuable accessory for hearing aid users. A 2017 Nielsen survey1 reported that the US 65+ population consumes a daily average of 6 hours and 57 minutes of TV. Despite the growing number of mobile and web-based streaming services, watching TV is more popular than ever. But for some, it’s a struggle to hear the TV. Hearing aid users can find it hard to hear the TV over the other sounds in the room. In fact, some studies suggest that 78% of hearing aid users have trouble understanding things on the TV.

Cheap hearing aids in Devon

Designed for ease of use. According to Widex, TV PLAY lets hearing aid users enjoy great TV sound effortlessly through their hearing aids by providing direct streaming to both ears. TV PLAY is designed for fast and easy to set up, intuitive to control, and delivers outstanding and stable sound.

TV PLAY drops the “boxy” look of many TV streamers and instead has a futuristic design that blends in with modern homes. And if you prefer to have TV PLAY out of sight, the slim and discrete design fits behind flat screen TVs with no trouble, according to the company.

Ear wax removal in Devon

“At Widex we work to ensure that hearing aid users get the most of all aspects of life,” said Widex President and CEO Jørgen Jensen in a press statement. “We know that TV is an important part of staying in touch with the world around them through news and entertainment programs. TV PLAY gives them a better and more stable experience that also looks great in their living rooms.”

Maximum streaming stability. With Widex’s patent-pending dual-antenna technology, TV PLAY is said to offer maximum streaming stability. An easy-to-use app lets users balance the volume of the TV sound with ambient sounds and conversations—or choose just to hear the sound from the TV.

1. Nielsen. Total Audience Report Q2 2017. November 16, 2017. Available at: https://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/reports/2017/the-nielsen-total-audience-q2-2017.html

Source: Widex A/S

Hearing aids East Devon

Hearing aids East Devon

The Honiton hearing centre

 

Hearing aids East Devon, at the Honiton hearing centre run by Colin and Sam Eaton. Digital hearing aids have changed beyond recognition in the last 5 years. If you are using older hearing aids or have been using NHS hearing aids and would like to try the latest discreet digital hearing aids with connectivity with your mobile phone, tablet and T.V. Honiton hearing offer a free trial. Please contact Sam on reception. We use PhonakGN ReSoundOticon and other manufacturers hearing aids.

Ear wax removal Devon

The Honiton hearing centre also conduct ear wax removal using Microsuction and the traditional water irrigation technique. You can watch our video here to see how we do this and how painless and quick it really is.

Honiton hearing news:

Researchers Identify Gene Associated with Age-related Hearing Loss

 

Mouse study reveals contributor to hearing loss

An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, MD, PhD, associate professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, PhD, program leader track scientist, Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC Harwell Institute, UK, have identified the gene that acts as a key regulator for special cells needed in hearing.

The discovery of this gene (Ikzf2) will help researchers better understand this unique type of cell that is needed for hearing and potentially develop treatments for common age-related hearing loss, UMSOM announced.

“Outer hair cells are the first inner ear cells lost as we age,” said Hertzano, whose research will be published in the journal Nature. “Age-related hearing loss happens to everyone. Even a 30-year-old has lost some of the outer hair cells that sense higher pitch sounds. Simple exposure to sound, especially loud ones, eventually causes damage to these cells.”

The inner ear has two kinds of sensory hair cells required for hearing. The inner hair cells convert sounds to neural signals that travel to the brain. This compares to outer hair cells, which function by amplifying and tuning sounds. Without outer hair cells, sound is severely muted and inner hair cells don’t signal the brain. Loss of outer hair cells is said to be the major cause of age-related loss of hearing.

About the Research

Hertzano’s group, in collaboration with Ran Elkon, PhD, senior lecturer, Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler Faculty of Medicine in Tel Aviv, Israel, took a bioinformatics and functional genomics approach to discover a gene critical for the regulation of genes involved in outer hair cell development. Bowl’s group studied mice from the Harwell Aging Screen to identify mice with hearing loss. Bowl identified mice with an early-onset hearing loss caused by an outer hair cell deficit. When the two groups realized that they were studying the same gene, they began to collaborate to discover its biological function and role in outer hair cell development. The gene is Ikzf2 gene, which encodes helios. Helios is a transcription factor, a protein that controls the expression of other genes. The mutation in the mice changes one amino acid in a critical part of the protein, which impaired the transcriptional regulatory activity of helios in the mice.

To test if helios could drive the differentiation of outer hair cells, the researchers introduced a virus engineered to overexpress helios into the inner ear hair cells of newborn mice. As a result, some of the mature inner hair cells became more like outer hair cells. In particular, the inner hair cells with an excess of helios started making the protein prestin and exhibited electromotility, a property limited to outer hair cells. Thus, helios can drive inner hair cells to adopt critical outer hair cell characteristics.

Hearing aids East Devon

Funding for the research was provided by Action on Hearing Loss UK, the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) at the National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Defense (DOD).

As Professor Steve Brown, PhD, director, MRC Harwell Institute, said, “The development of therapies for age-related hearing loss represents one of the big challenges facing medicine and biomedical science. Understanding the genetic programs that are responsible for the development and maturation of sound-transducing hair cells within the inner ear will be critical to exploring avenues for the regeneration of these cells that are lost in abundance during age-related hearing loss. The teams from the University of Maryland and the MRC Harwell Research Institute have given us the first insights into that program. They have identified a master regulator, Ikzf2/helios, that controls the program for maturation of outer hair cells. Now, we have a target that we can potentially use to induce the production of outer hair cells within damaged inner ears, and we are one step closer to offering treatments for this disabling condition.”

Original Paper: Chessum L, Matern MS, Kelly MC, et al. Helios is a key transcriptional regulator of outer hair cell maturation. Nature. November 21, 2018.

Source: University of Maryland School of Medicine, Nature

Image: University of Maryland School of Medicine

Hearing solutions, Honiton, Devon

Hearing solutions, Devon, Hearing aids and earwax

Hearing solutions, Devon, Hearing aids and earwax available at the Honiton hearing centre near Exeter and Tiverton. The Honiton hearing centre is conveniently situated between Exeter and Sidmouth but covers the whole of Devon. They also cover South Somerset and North Devon. If you are suffering with blocked ears or think you may have ear wax issues please make an appointment with Sam to see Mr Colin Eaton the lead audiologist.  If you are in need of a comprehensive hearing test, the Honiton hearing centre can help there too. Dispensing thousands of hearing ads through their time in Devon, Colin Eaton knows a thing or two about hearing aids. The very latest digital hearing aids are available.

Honiton hearing news:

Cochlear and GN Expand Smart Hearing Alliance Collaboration

Original story by The Hearing Review

Cochlear and GN ReSound Smart Hearing Alliance

Cochlear Limited (ASX: COH), a maker of implantable hearing solutions, and GN (GN.CO), a manufacturer of intelligent audio solutions, signed a new agreement to “significantly expand” their Smart Hearing Alliance collaboration, GN announced on its website.

The Smart Hearing Alliance was established in 2015 to develop the most integrated, best-in-class hearing solutions—giving hearing aid and cochlear implant recipients access to the latest in connectivity and wireless technology, and helping bimodal recipients to achieve seamless connectivity between a cochlear implant in one ear, and a GN hearing aid in the other. The deepening of this relationship includes joint research and development, shared technology, and strengthened global Smart Hearing Alliance commercial collaboration between Cochlear and GN Hearing, the hearing aid division of the GN Group.

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Cochlear and GN Hearing are now strengthening focus on their integrated product offering and expanding their presence in the clinical hearing aid and implantable hearing solutions markets globally. According to the announcement, the vision for this new collaboration will include a focus on fast-moving connectivity and wireless technology to allow for closer integration between Cochlear and GN Hearing technologies. The two companies will leverage research and development investment to jointly develop firmware and software technologies.

In addition to technology sharing, the two companies will strengthen the commercial collaboration and work together to enable clinicians to deliver a more seamless solution and best-in-class hearing experience to their patients.

GN Hearing CFO Marcus Desimoni and Cochlear CEO and President Dig Howitt welcomed the signing of the expanded agreement.

Devon hearing aids

Desimoni said: “This strengthened alliance is an important step forward for the millions of people around the world with disabling hearing loss—making the most advanced technology more accessible and simplifying the experience with more integrated solutions. GN Hearing is committed to advancing what is possible for people with hearing loss. This strategic partnership is a very smart and cost-effective way to expand the R&D capacity of both companies to reach our goals.”

Howitt said: “At Cochlear, we’re driven to develop hearing solutions that empower people to connect with others and live a full life. By expanding our collaboration with GN Hearing, we’re able to bring the latest in connectivity and wireless technology to our implant recipients more quickly. We’re also able to give bimodal recipients—those using a cochlear implant in one ear, and a hearing aid in the other—unparalleled performance and a seamless experience with both devices. As two leaders in our areas of hearing health, this collaboration demonstrates our commitment to design and bring to market the best hearing solutions available.”

This collaboration aims to improve the hearing outcomes for more people with moderate to profound hearing loss. In developing more integrated bimodal hearing solutions, Cochlear and GN Hearing have focused on helping to achieve greater connectivity for people—not only between the two companies’ devices, but also with Apple and Android technology. Most recently, Cochlear and GN Hearing collaborated to bring to market the what is said to be the “first Made for iPhone” Smart Bimodal Solution, enabling recipients to synchronize streaming to both ears from a compatible iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. The Nucleus® 7 Bimodal Solutionis delivered by using a Cochlear Nucleus 7 Sound Processor in one ear, a compatible ReSound hearing aid in the other ear, and a paired iPhone or iPod touch to control functionality for both hearing devices.

Hearing test Devon

The Smart Hearing Alliance delivers bimodal solutions connecting Cochlear Nucleus cochlear implants, Cochlear Baha bone conduction implants, wireless accessories, and ReSound hearing aids.

Source: GN, Cochlear Ltd

Image: GN, Cochlear Ltd